Auto accidents are unfortunate for everyone involved. For the person at fault, an accident creates a specific set of problems. In addition to dealing with the damage caused by the crash, an at-fault driver must also think about personal medical bills too. Knowing that you have the right insurance and that your medical bills will be covered can be a welcome relief after such a stressful event.
The types of auto insurance policies you should know
Knowing the differences in types of auto insurance policies is key to understanding medical coverages.
Liability coverage pays for the medical expenses of the other driver and passengers you hit, plus any damage done to their vehicle as well as general damages for personal injuries.
Collision coverage would cover any damage to your vehicle if you were at fault for the crash.
In its broadest sense, liability insurance covers the conduct of a person, persons, or a business following an incident resulting in injury or death and helps protect them from the risk of liabilities imposed by lawsuits or similar claims.
Vermont law requires that you at least have liability coverage as a driver. Gender, age, location, marital status, credit history, and the car make and model will affect how much you pay for your insurance premiums.
Liability insurance, unfortunately, does not cover the at-fault driver’s medical expenses. However, you can purchase in Vermont medical payments coverage that covers medical costs for the policyholder, family members under the same roof and passengers regardless of fault. It’s portable meaning it goes where you go and it’s cheap. For example, if you were sitting on your porch and someone drove his car onto the porch and inured you there would be coverage. Or if you are riding your bike and are hit by a car whether it’s your fault or not there is med pay coverage. Purchasing this option available in Vermont and covers not only medical expenses but also chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy and funeral expenses.

Warnings and exceptions
In general, if you buy only liability coverage, prepare to assume the risk of covering your injuries if you are at fault in an accident. The state-required minimum limit is often very low and is used up quickly, even if injuries are minor. In Vermont it’s $25,000.00. Because of this, consider how much extra you may want to pay to increase your liability limits. While raising your coverage means that you will pay more per month for your premium, this option costs far less than being responsible for paying the medical bills for everyone involved in the accident.
No matter what level of coverage you have, make sure to read your policy and follow up with your insurance company if you have any questions.